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Because I love playing my instrument : Young musicians' internalised motivation and self-regulated practising behaviour

Renwick, James Michael, English, Media, & Performing Arts, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW

2008

  • Title:
    Because I love playing my instrument : Young musicians' internalised motivation and self-regulated practising behaviour
  • Author/Creator: Renwick, James Michael, English, Media, & Performing Arts, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW
  • Subjects: Self-regulated learning theory; Music education; Achievement motivation; Self-determination theory; Musicians; Motivation in education
  • Resource type: Thesis
  • Type of thesis: Ph.D.
  • Date: 2008
  • Awarding institution: University of New South Wales. English, Media, & Performing Arts
  • Description: Self-regulated learning theory explains how it is not only the amount of time musicians spend practising that affects achievement, but also the nature of the strategies employed. Because practice is self-directed, motivational effects on its efficiency are especially salient. One construct that has received little attention in relation to practising is self-determination theory, which interprets motivation as lying along a continuum of perceived autonomy. This mixed-methods study investigated links between motivational beliefs and self-regulated practising behaviour through a two-phase design. In Phase One, 677 music examination candidates aged 8-19 completed a questionnaire consisting of items addressing practising behaviour and perceived musical competence; in addition, the Self-Regulation Questionnaire (SRQ; Ryan & Connell, 1989) was adapted to explore intrinsic-extrinsic motives for learning an instrument. Factor analysis of the SRQ revealed five dimensions with partial correspondence to earlier research: internal, external, social, shame-related, and exam-related motives. Three practice behaviour factors consistent with self-regulated learning theory emerged: effort management, monitoring, and strategy use. Results of structural equation modelling showed that internal motivation accounted best for variance in these three types of practising behaviour, with a small added effect from competence beliefs and exam-related motivation. Phase Two consisted of observational case studies of four of the questionnaire participants preparing for their subsequent annual examination. Adolescent, intermediate-level musicians were recorded while practising at home; immediately afterwards, they watched the videotape and verbalised any recollected thoughts. The procedure concluded with a semi-structured interview and debriefing. The videotapes were analysed with The Observer Video-Pro and combined with verbal data; emerging themes were then compared with issues arising from the interviews. The observational aspect of the case studies largely confirmed the importance of three cyclical self-regulatory processes emerging from Phase One: (a) effort management and motivational self-regulation, (b) the role of self-monitoring of accuracy, and (c) the use of corrective strategies, such as structured repetition, task simplification, and vocalisation. The mixture of quantitative and qualitative methods used in the study has uncovered a rich body of information that begins to clarify the complex motivational and behavioural nature of young people practising a musical instrument.
  • Supervisor: Schubert, Emery, English, Media, & Performing Arts, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW,McPherson, Gary, English, Media, & Performing Arts, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW
  • Language: English
  • Rights: http://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/copyright; http://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/copyright
  • Print Availability: T/2008/12 (Ask at Level 2 Help Zone, UNSW Library)

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